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Till We Have Faces

A Myth Retold

by C. S. Lewis
Wanda McCaddon

Audiobook

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C. S. Lewis reworks the timeless myth of Cupid and Psyche into an enduring piece of contemporary fiction in this novel about the struggle between sacred and profane love. Set in the pre-Christian world of Glome on the outskirts of Greek civilization, it is a tale of two princesses: the beautiful Psyche, who is loved by the god of love himself, and Orual, Psyche’s unattractive and embittered older sister, who loves Psyche with a destructive possessiveness. Her frustration and jealousy over Psyche’s fate sets Orual on the troubled path of self-discovery. Lewis’s last work of fiction, this is often considered his best by critics.


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Publisher: Blackstone Audio, Inc.
Edition: Unabridged

OverDrive Listen audiobook

  • ISBN: 9781481560252
  • File size: 233837 KB
  • Release date: April 20, 2005
  • Duration: 08:06:11

MP3 audiobook

  • ISBN: 9781481560252
  • File size: 233837 KB
  • Release date: April 20, 2005
  • Duration: 08:06:11
  • Number of parts: 8


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0 of 1 copy available
21 people waiting per copy

Formats

OverDrive Listen audiobook
MP3 audiobook

subjects

Fiction Literature

Languages

English

Levels

C. S. Lewis reworks the timeless myth of Cupid and Psyche into an enduring piece of contemporary fiction in this novel about the struggle between sacred and profane love. Set in the pre-Christian world of Glome on the outskirts of Greek civilization, it is a tale of two princesses: the beautiful Psyche, who is loved by the god of love himself, and Orual, Psyche’s unattractive and embittered older sister, who loves Psyche with a destructive possessiveness. Her frustration and jealousy over Psyche’s fate sets Orual on the troubled path of self-discovery. Lewis’s last work of fiction, this is often considered his best by critics.


Expand title description text